Haworthia bayeri

Haworthia bayeri

Scientific Name

Haworthia bayeri J.D.Venter & S.A.Hammer

Synonyms

Haworthia hayashii, Haworthia indigoa, Haworthia jadea, Haworthia laeta, Haworthia truterorum

Scientific Classification

Family: Asphodelaceae
Subfamily: Asphodeloideae
Tribe: Aloeae
Genus: Haworthia

Description

Haworthia bayeri is one of the most spectacular, retuse-leaved species, highly sought-after for its beautiful leaf markings. It can be distinguished from its Haworthia relatives, by its rounded leaf tips and its dark color. The upper leaf faces are semi-translucent. They are usually marked with longitudinal lines or reticulated patterns, rather than with spots or flecks. The rosettes are usually solitary, as the plant rarely forms offsets. The flowers are small, whitish-green, and appear from spring to summer. It is variable and has multiple different regional forms.

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zones 10a to 11b: from 30 °F (−1.1 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

How to Grow and Care

These succulents are not considered difficult houseplants to grow. If you can keep a pot of Aloe alive on a windowsill, chances are you can do the same with a dish of Haworthia. As with all succulents, the most dangerous situation is too much water. They should never be allowed to sit in water under any circumstances. At the same time, these decorative, little plants can be grown in interesting containers such as teacups and even baby shoes. If you're given a Haworthia in such a container, make sure the container had adequate drainage.

Haworthias are small, usually remaining between 3 and 5 inches (7.5 cm and 12.5 cm) in height and relatively slow-growing. They are often grown in small clusters in wide, shallow dishes. Over time, clusters will naturally enlarge as the mother plant sends off small plantlets. When the cluster has outgrown its dish, repot in the spring or early summer into a new wide and shallow dish with fresh potting soil. This is also the time to take offsets for propagation.

Learn more at How to Grow and Care for Haworthia.

Origin

Haworthia bayeri is endemic to the southern Cape Provinces in South Africa.

Links

  • Back to genus Haworthia
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

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It can be distinguished from its Haworthia relatives, by its rounded leaf tips and its dark colour.

The upper leaf faces are semi-translucent. They are usually marked with longitudinal lines or reticulated patterns, rather than with spots or flecks. Rosettes are usually solitary, as the plant rarely forms offsets.

This species is variable and has multiple different regional forms:

Flowers appear in September and October. [1]

Relatives Edit

A western form, inhabiting shale rocks near Oudtshoorn, is sometimes considered a separate species, Haworthia truteriorum. It is smaller, dull-green, with silver lines or flecks on its leaves, which have more strongly toothed margins. [2]

An outlying population of similar plants in the Rooinek Pass, south of Laingsburg, is now usually classed as a separate species, Haworthia marxii.

The natural range of this species is in the arid Little Karoo area around the boundary between the Western Cape and the Eastern Cape Provinces, South Africa. Here is occurs roughly between Oudtshoorn in the west and Uniondale in the east. This is an arid summer rainfall region. In the east of its range, the plants have a rougher, more scabrid leaf surface.

It grows easily in cultivation, but requires very well drained soil. It can be propagated by leaf cuttings and seed, as it rarely offsets.

It is threatened by illegal collection for the horticultural trade, as well as habitat destruction. Populations have therefore suffered considerable decline. [3]


Haworthia Species

Family: Asphodelaceae (as-foh-del-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Haworthia (ha-WORTH-ee-a) (Info)
Species: bayeri (BAY-er-ee) (Info)
Synonym:Haworthia bayeri var. hayashii
Synonym:Haworthia bayeri var. jadea
Synonym:Haworthia hayashii
Synonym:Haworthia indigoa
Synonym:Haworthia laeta

Category:

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs Water regularly do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Suitable for growing in containers

Danger:

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

From seed direct sow after last frost

From seed germinate in vitro in gelatin, agar or other medium

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Allow pods to dry on plant break open to collect seeds

Seed does not store well sow as soon as possible

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Casa de Oro-Mount Helix, California

Vista, California(9 reports)

Gardeners' Notes:

On Feb 14, 2005, htop from San Antonio, TX (Zone 8b) wrote:

This species has very thick trianglar-shaped leaves which have random fine white lines across the leaf surfaces.

If you are not familiar with its cultivation, research information on growing and/or propagating techniques because a haworthia requires special care that is too detailed to list here.


Distribution [ edit ]

The natural range of this species is in the arid Little Karoo area around the boundary between the Western Cape and the Eastern Cape Provinces, South Africa. Here is occurs roughly between Oudtshoorn in the west and Uniondale in the east. This is an arid summer rainfall region. In the east of its range, the plants have a rougher, more scabrid leaf surface.

It grows easily in cultivation, but requires very well drained soil. It can be propagated by leaf cuttings and seed, as it rarely offsets.

It is threatened by illegal collection for the horticultural trade, as well as habitat destruction. Populations have therefore suffered considerable decline. [3]


Watch the video: Salvando Haworthias color chocolate de deshidratación Haworthia Emelyae y Haworthia bayeri.